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Apraxia and Stuttering?

This past year I witnessed two children ages 4 and 5 each entered my practice with a diagnosis of Childhood Apraxia of Speech and subsequently stuttering. Both were highly unintelligible.  The term makes parents very nervous.  This is a good description what it means: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/childhood-apraxia-of-speech/symptoms-causes/syc-20352045 It is interesting as both of these children went through the Lidcombe Program for stuttering and became increasingly more fluent, intelligibility improved. Both have oral motor dysfunction but are sending less apraxic or dyspraxic. So what happened? How did their language improve and articulation issues decrease. yes, PROMPT helped but the stuttering definitely caused difficulties the language development. So do not wait! Please seek help early. Lori@allislandspeech.com


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Day 1 of MPI 2 Program-To help with stuttering

Day 1 consists of reading to reduce short bursts of phonation. It is the start of a journey and regression is not possible because it is done a little at a time. We work up to improving fluency and the journey continues over a 9 month process. Who is this program for? Someone 18 or older who wants to improve fluency and is internally motivated. Someone who has two hour a day for approximately ten days to work on fluency and confidence. Enrollment is based upon a consult with Lori Melnitsky.  Lori explains the program and provides an assessment to determine if the program meets your needs. Please email Lori@allislandspeech.com for more information. www.mpi2.com  


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Talking about Stuttering is not fun..What do we do?

I recently received an email from a speech pathologist who was concerned about a teenager who stutters on her caseload. I was thrilled she asked how to help. She observed this 11 year old was not talking too much or not interested in exploring the topic of stuttering. So what do we do? Children get a ton of questions from their parents and even at my age my mom likes to know what is going on. I work part time in a high school and the last thing they want me doing is asking questions about their lives. They love talking about their strengths, sports or cars. It is up to me to find ways of encouraging them without making stuttering the highlight of their lives. The truth is people who stutter want to talk. Most people do not like talking about things that bother them, ex: weight, poor hearing […]


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