Categories for parenting


Lori Melnitsky-Journey with Stuttering

Lori Melnitsky by Beverly Fortune on September 2, 2009 Lori Melnitsky has been stuttering since she was four years old. It was a long journey for her to get to where she is today: one of the rare stutterers to have recovered from a severe stuttering disorder that has gone on to become a successful fluency expert and speech pathologist in a private practice. “Back then it wasn’t talked about,” Lori says. “It was a very hidden topic and you were embarrassed by it. There was a tremendous amount of shame. I was never part of anything in school,” she says. “I went to speech therapy but didn’t speak. [My stutter] became worse and I couldn’t say my name, [when I tried] my head would jerk back.” “I don’t think many people know what [stuttering] is,” Lori explains. “It’s a communication disorder that is characterized by the disruption of the normal flow of […]


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What causes stuttering?

What Causes Stuttering?   (This was adapted from the Stuttering Foundation of America) Stuttering Facts and Information What is stuttering? Stuttering is a communication disorder in which the flow of speech is broken by repetitions (li-li-like this), prolongations (lllllike this), or abnormal stoppages (no sound) of sounds and syllables. There may also be unusual facial and body movements associated with the effort to speak. Stuttering is also referred to as stammering. What causes stuttering? There are four factors most likely to contribute to the development of stuttering: genetics (approximately 60% of those who stutter have a family member who does also); child development (children with other speech and language problems or developmental delays are more likely to stutter); neurophysiology (recent neurological research has shown that people who stutter process speech and language slightly differently than those who do not stutter); and family dynamics (high expectations and fast-paced lifestyles can contribute to stuttering). […]


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Help your child who stutters in a pandemic…

——News alert… I am upset and I cannot hide this… Going to the ER for stuttering.??What???? I cannot stress this enough, especially now…. if your child is stuttering do not wait!!!! ….I can only speak for over 25 years of therapy, It is the same doing online therapy for children who stutter as if they are in person. If anything it increases talking and helps parent help their children. Most schools do not have stuttering specialists on staff nor provide summer services. Teens and adults are relieved when I talk with them to learn strategies to speak more fluently. Stuttering can be cyclical in nature but if it is continuing then please reach out. I am getting too many calls of people waiting for schools in September. I have gotten unusual calls of worried parents who were told to bring their children as young as 4 to bring their kids […]


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Top questions to ask speech pathologists if your child stutters so they succeed?

Did you know only one percent of the population stutters? Did you know that most of  graduate students do not work with anyone who stutters in their careers? It takes time to change speech patterns.  If your child is under 7 parents should be in the speech room because Lidcombe is the best therapy out there. What should you ask? What is your experience with stuttering? How many years have you worked with stuttering? How can you help my child?


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Why Private pay as opposed to school speech therapy?

I want to start by saying that I have worked in public schools before. I totally respect my school speech pathologists.  They work hard for our children and have huge caseloads. Many kids who stutter or receive Prompt therapy are in groups of 5.   It is vital for kids who stutter to have parents either in the session or available at the end to facilitate progress. The Lidcombe program which is used up to about age 7 or 8 requires parents to actively work with their children at home.  This is not a school program.  It is a disservice to your child to do this program without parents present. Prompt is hands on so it is not sanitary to have the therapist’s hands on 2 or 3 children. They need a high level of expertise and individual therapy. Not all school speech pathologists specialize. Schools cannot solve every speech or […]


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Superman or Tigger? Who would you choose?

The truth is the evidence for childhood stuttering isn’t great.  As a result I can only tell you what I have seen and sometimes hands on experience helps you learn more than what research can tell you. I have seen so many great success stories and  I am not sure where to start. Let’s all the remember the goal of childhood stuttering to try and eliminate stuttering or reduce to a mild level so the child can communicate freely without fear or holding back. We must keep the child talking so the fear of stuttering doesn’t impact their ability to communicate now and in the future. I cannot lie that I did avoid talking at one point in my life but that was because of the judgements of the world around me and not because of speech therapy.  All my speech pathologists encouraged me to talk regardless of stuttering. I […]


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How I became a Speech Pathologist…

Never say never. I was not the best student in high school. I was unsure what I wanted and stuttered severely. Please read. I am not doing teen life coaching and of course stuttering and speech therapy.  Please email me at Lori@allislandspeech.com in strict confidence. https://allislandspeech.com/HowIbecameaSpeechLanguagePathologist.php


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Preschool Stuttering.. Do not wait

If you would like more information on the Lidcombe Program for Early Childhood Stuttering, please visit www.allislandspeech.com Speech difficulties Fiona Baker bodyandsoul.com.au At least a quarter of child stutterers will need some form of treatment. And the earlier, the better. For Gary*, watching The King’s Speech was a painful process. As a former stutterer – who still occasionally relapses when anxious – the movie re-opened some old childhood wounds. “I can’t remember not stuttering,” says the 49-year-old who eventually in his 20s learnt to control his stammer. “But back then it was considered ‘my affliction’ and nothing much was done to treat it. “I grew up in the country and I just had to deal with it. The thing is, I couldn’t deal with it – I was teased, even by my siblings, and became quiet and withdrawn and felt isolated and unable to make friends.” Life-long impact It’s estimated that […]


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