Categories for stuttering therapy


Helping the College Student Who Stutters become fluent…..

Helping the College Student Who Stutter Become fluent….. Yes, there is hope and treatment. What can you do to help: Find someone who specializes in stuttering. Talk to someone who stutters who overcame stuttering Be fearless and let others help you. Learn better eye contact Believe in yourself. For more information please contact Lori@allislandspeech.com Lori stuttering severely and learned not to let stuttering stop her. She knows what fluency feels like and it changed her life and advanced her career. #stuttering #stopstuttering #speechtherapy


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Best tools to help teens and adults who stutter…

Many times I am asked what tools to use with stuttering.  Too many times people are looking at manuals and tools to cure stuttering. The truth is there are no immediate cures for stuttering. The positive is that I stuttered severely and can communicate clearly, more fluently and do not dread speaking. People need to talk about their interests.  I have several teens who stutter who love basketball, wrestling, baseball, hockey and we get our best results reading articles and discussion. An adult I treat is a professional photographer. We use his interests to work on fluency. It improves stuttering, confidence and listening. So ditch the manuals. Work on their interests. #stuttering #stop stuttering For more information please contact Lori@allislandspeech.com


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Why should adults who Stutter take the MPI 2 Stuttering?

Adults who stutter are tired of stuttering. They want to get the job they want. They want to stop hiding stuttering. They want to not fear getting stuck. I took the program and put over 30 adults through it. Reasons: It is more natural It is intensive I am teaching it and went through it I am a coach too It changes how you speak #stuttering #stop stuttering For more information and to contact Lori Melnitsky, a speech pathologist who overcame stuttering and was tired of stuttering too. www.allislandspeech.com


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Why I stutter but do not need breath support from speech pathologists….

All my life I have been told from speech pathologists, doctors and listeners to stop, calm down and breathe. Do you know the message this sends? It says..You are nervous, anxious and have a lung capacity issue. Wrong and so misunderstood. Even now when I am told this I tense up more, my breathing becomes abrupt and the stuttering increases. It is embarrassing, humiliating and teaching people who stutter the wrong way to help them. Yes our breathing might be disrupted but with the correct help to connect words, sentences, and become more confident speakers we can succeed. Taking a big deep breath will make your stuttering worse. Leave the breathing to the medical professionals if you have a a pulmonary medical issue. Leave the stuttering therapy to the specialists who can help make communication easier and effective. For more information please email Lori@allislandspeech.com www.allislandspeech.com #stuttering #stopstuttering


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How overcoming stuttering changed my life…

My quest for fluency was endless. It also involved learning how to converse, pause and speak.  These are ways that fluency helped me. In a world where math is stressed I can honestly say it had no impact on my life but stuttering did. This is how it helped me: Became more confident stopped getting laughed at for not saying my name Hired as an adjunct professor Was interviewed for radio and TV shows Became a speech pathologist Allowed me to advocate for my children when needed. Enabled me to make phone calls. Stopped thinking about stuttering and being ashamed from morning to night. Gave me strength Learned how to fight discrimination. For more information contact Lori @516776-0184 www.allislandspeech.com #stuttering #stop stuttering #cure stuttering


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Hello I stutter, Do you hear me? My name is Lori..The non traditional speech pathologist…

Stuttering? Who understands how I speak? How loud do I have to scream to be heard?  I remember being 5 and told I should do a play for my parents, being 8 and doing art projects, being 15 and filling out questionnaires and then age 22 filling out the stuttering instruments for assessment.  I have no memory of who these people were but I do remember feeling invisible. No child or adult should do it this way. Did anyone hear me? Could they stop  writing notes? Does anyone know how to help me?  Aren’t you a speech pathologist? Stop reading. I am a person. Will anyone ask about me, my hobbies, my life? The pain is still there. I became a speech pathologist. Not only did I learn how to speak more fluently with confidence, I learned to help most people I work with who stutter. Never doubt how much […]


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How to accurately conduct a stuttering assessment in children:

Stuttering is complex and a challenge to assess.  Many speech pathologists have not met anyone who stutters and barely learned about it in graduate school.  Stuttering involves uncovering the many layers of emotions as well. For the speech-language pathologists it is not too late to learn. What do we do first? Case History: We need to gather background information. Is there history of stuttering in family? Any medical information? How old was the patient when stuttering started? Has stuttering increased over time? Any prior therapy? Did it help? Is stuttering affecting their life? Any co-morbid diagnoses or medication taken? How? Parent Report: Talk to the parent. Gather a video or audio sample from home.  Talk to the teacher and ask if the child is talking in class. This is sometimes hard to gauge as not all children participate in school. Assess Fluency and Stuttering: The Stuttering Severity Instrument (SSI-4) provides […]


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Practical Tips for Teens who Stutter to Facilitate Carryover…

  Teen Stuttering: Practical Suggestions for Carryover by Lori Melnitsky from New York, USA Improving fluency outside of the clinical setting is an immense challenge for both the client and the treating therapist. I often hear adults talk about feelings of failure as a result of not being able to improve their fluency at a younger age in conversational speaking situations. As a result, many have given up on speech therapy and view their past experiences as negative. Feelings of blame and guilt develop and it is truly not their fault. Practice groups are important in hopes of preventing inner feelings of guilt and to improve confidence in speaking. The importance of using fluency tools and effective communication strategies in functional communication situations cannot be stressed enough. Trying to decrease stuttering and be a part of the “fluent” world is an added stress, especially for a teenagers who are concerned […]


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What Joe Biden has taught us about stuttering…

Many of you have asked my opinion of Joe Biden in regard to stuttering so let me explain a few things.   First the word stutterer is a label. The preferred term is a person who stutters. It is also a person with ADHD, a person with autism, a person with a bad leg, a person with glasses, etc. Understanding this is key to respecting others.   People who stutter are as smart as anyone else. This is a life I have lead and I would be lying if I did not state it still pains me. Looking into the eyes and seeing bewilderment, laughter and confusion when I have stuttered is not a new concept. This is not new to me and the people I know who stutter. This is not new to Joe Biden. He can handle it. Interrupting and badgering someone who stutters might increase stuttering but […]


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An overview of cluttering as a speech disorder…

When speech becomes cluttered with faulty phrases, repetitions, fillers, unrelated words, and unintelligible terms, it leads to a communication disorder. With cluttering, speech becomes difficult to understand, and people speak at a rapid rate. This fluency pattern makes it difficult for listeners to understand the style of speaking. There’s an irregular rhythm, marked by inappropriate pauses along with unfinished words and sentences. Although, during conversations they are asked to repeat often, people with cluttering issues are unaware of their deficits. Stuttering and cluttering are closely related to fluency disorders and can also co-exist. With the help of an experienced speech-language pathologist, they can easily help you identify the communication disorder and develop a treatment plan. Free Download: 4 Assessments for Stuttering Handout Assessment for cluttering Speech therapy for cluttering must be customized to the needs of the person seeking treatment. As per the cluttering assessment paper published by Yvonne van […]


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